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Illustration by Amy Friend

Lord of the WASPs [private]

My grandmother bought her first island in 1952. It was eight acres in the shape of a meaty drumstick, a hunk of sunbaked granite off the eastern shore of the Georgian Bay, in southern Ontario. The island was strewn with juniper and blueberry, along with a few magisterial white pines, each extruding from the nearly soilless surface like a frilled sandwich pick from a crusty loaf. At its highest point was an outcrop of smooth, pink rock—a viewsome site for a cottage. Fifty feet below lay a natural harbor. At a comfortable swimming distance from shore were three shoals, strategically arranged like a hedgerow, as if to demarcate the property line. My grandmother, the wife of a Cleveland investment banker, named the island Tyrone, after the county in Northern Ireland where her father had been born. She paid the Province of Ontario $1,800 for it, a transaction belying the strong probability that no government official—and likely no more than a handful of human beings ever—had set foot on it.


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Photo by Jeff Sharlet

Telemetry [private]

For two years I’ve been walking into the tall grass to take snapshots of this field at the top of the “crooked mile,” a winding hill that leads into the shallow valley of swamp and stream in which my house stands, just past the sign that reads pavement ends. I use my phone. I want the rough eye. The note. The diary. The record. The document. This time, this moment, unplanned.


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Illustration by Lauren Simkin Berke

Sport vs. Game [private]

Toward the end of the film version of Peter Gent’s corrosively sarcastic football yarn North Dallas Forty, a lineman played by real-life gridiron hero John Matuszak throws a fit upon hearing one more you’re-not-worthy upbraiding from a sniveling, corporate-minded coach. “To you it’s just a business, but to us it’s still gotta be a sport,” he shouts. “Every time I call it a game you call it a business, and every time I call it a business you call it a game!”


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VQR Online

VQR Thanks Outgoing Publisher Jon Parrish Peede

September 28, 2016

Virginia Quarterly Review Publisher Jon Parrish Peede, who has led the publication for the past five years, has resigned effective September 30 to return to his writing career, nonprofit consulting, and arts advocacy. 

This year, Peede oversaw the operational transition of VQR from the office of the Vice President for Research to the newly established Center for Media and Citizenship at the University of Virginia. Media Studies Professor Siva Vaidhyanathan, the founding director of the center, thanked Peede for his service to the publication.

“Jon Peede has served VQR with creativity and commitment through much transition,” Vaidhyanathan said. “He served during a time of great financial pressure on magazines. Throughout his time with VQR, the magazine published some of the finest prose, fiction, poetry, and photography in the world.”

Posts from Meera Subramanian's Instagram series, "Elemental India."

#VQRTrueStory

December 7, 2015

#VQRtruestory is our new social-media experiment in nonfiction, bringing readers compelling stories and images from around the world, all through our Instagram feed.

The Death of Pablo Neruda

May 5, 2015

“Looking back now, I could have so easily walked to that cemetery and joined the men and women chanting next to his coffin,” Ariel Dorfman confesses. In addition to the documentary, "The Death of Pablo Neruda," this multimedia work includes an essay, “From Beyond the Grave,” by Dorfman, poetry by Martín Espada and Idra Novey, and a translation of Neruda’s poem “XII from The Heights of Macchu Picchu” by Mark Eisner.