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Francisco Cantú

Francisco Cantú is a writer, translator, and the author of The Line Becomes a River (Riverhead, 2018). A former Fulbright fellow, he has been the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, a Whiting Award, and an Art for Justice fellowship. His writing and translations appear in the New Yorker, Best American Essays 2016, and Harper’s, as well as on This American Life. A lifelong resident of the Southwest, he now lives in Tucson, Arizona.

Author

Illustration by Abigail Piña Rocha Carlisle

Murmurs on the Plain

Summer 2020 | Essays

Rulfo’s literary reputation rests on just two slim books—the short story collection El Llano en llamas (The Plain in Flames), first published in 1953, and the novel Pedro Páramo, released two years later. Pedro Páramo would arguably go on to become the defining novel of Mexico’s twentieth century, inspiring the writers of Latin America’s “Boom” generation and helping to usher in a new age of literature across the continent.

Lisa Golightly, <em>Flood Line 333</em>, 2015.

Lines of  Sight

Spring 2020 | Essays

The town of Dunwich, once a thriving medieval port on England’s Suffolk Coast, has for centuries been crumbling into the sea. All that now remains of the old structures is a small collection of hilltop ruins, flanked by a nineteenth-century church and a handful of newer homes built far from the water’s edge. Served by a single pub and a few guesthouses, the local economy has long catered principally to visitors, many of whom are part of a long line of artists and poets who have been drawn here since the Victorian age to contemplate the town’s picturesque decay.