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Francisco Cantú

Francisco Cantú is a writer, translator, and the author of The Line Becomes a River (Riverhead, 2018). A former Fulbright fellow, he has been the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, a Whiting Award, and an Art for Justice fellowship. His writing and translations appear in the New Yorker, Best American Essays 2016, and Harper’s, as well as on This American Life. A lifelong resident of the Southwest, he now lives in Tucson, Arizona.

Author

Lisa Golightly, <em>Flood Line 333</em>, 2015.

Lines of  Sight

Spring 2020 | Essays

The town of Dunwich, once a thriving medieval port on England’s Suffolk Coast, has for centuries been crumbling into the sea. All that now remains of the old structures is a small collection of hilltop ruins, flanked by a nineteenth-century church and a handful of newer homes built far from the water’s edge. Served by a single pub and a few guesthouses, the local economy has long catered principally to visitors, many of whom are part of a long line of artists and poets who have been drawn here since the Victorian age to contemplate the town’s picturesque decay.