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discovery

Lisa Golightly, <em>Flood Line 333</em>, 2015.

Lines of  Sight

The town of Dunwich, once a thriving medieval port on England’s Suffolk Coast, has for centuries been crumbling into the sea. All that now remains of the old structures is a small collection of hilltop ruins, flanked by a nineteenth-century church and a handful of newer homes built far from the water’s edge. Served by a single pub and a few guesthouses, the local economy has long catered principally to visitors, many of whom are part of a long line of artists and poets who have been drawn here since the Victorian age to contemplate the town’s picturesque decay. 

Photograph by Emily Ding

Fossil Combing [private]

“You’ve come in the worst conditions,” Paddy Howe says drolly. It’s September and the seaside town of Lyme Regis is still basking in summer. Sunlight scintillates off the water, the sand-and-shingle beaches, the white façades of Georgian shophouses, hiding the fossils in plain sight of everyone who has come to pick them.